DAILY DOSE OF ART

As prescribed by Paulina Constancia

Cello con affetto 4: Cellists at Camp (USA)

Ever wonder where music students go when school is out or when summer break has begun?  Do they stop training? Do they go on holiday somewhere? The answer varies of course. However, for those who want to make a profession of music, they go to summer music camps or festivals.  On Day 4 of this special DDoA series “Cello con affetto”, I bring you 4 young American cellists with their experiences as well as  learnings at music camps/festivals that apply not only to their music but to life in general.

JENNIFER LANDAVERDE, MIKKO PABLO,  CECILIA ORAZI, and JENNIFER PITTMAN (USA)  


JENNIFER LANDAVERDE

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Cellist JENNIFER LANDAVERDE rehearsing
California, USA

DDoA: How long have you been studying/playing cello?
JL: I’ve been studying the cello for 7 years.

DDoA: How often do you practice?
JL:During the school year I make my best effort to practice every day, even if it’s just for a couple of hours. It requires a lot of self-discipline, and since I work best under pressure, I tend to practice most Monday-Friday, when I have strict schedules to follow. On average, I practice 3-4 hours a day during the week.

DDoA: How often do you perform? 
JL:
I’m not a soloist, so I do not perform as often as others do. I typically perform with the ensembles I play in, which average once every couple of months.

DDoA: Which university/program are you attending right now?
JL: I just graduated from Cal Sate University, Fullerton where I received a bachelor’s of art in music education.

DDoA: Are you currently a member of an orchestra/camerata?
JL: At the moment I am not a member of an orchestra.

DDoA:  How many times have you attended a summer music camp?
JL: I’ve attended a summer music camp about 3 times as a student participant. I’ve also attended a summer camp as an assistant/manager/instructor 3 times.

DDoA:  So far, which music camp has been the most memorable for you?
JL: The most memorable one for me has been the most recent one, Summit Music Festival. Which one has been the most helpful to your development? The one that was most helpful to my development as a musician was Kadima Summer Music Seminar because it was my first time participating in a chamber ensemble. I learned so much about listening and collaborating with other musicians. I fell in love with making and sharing music with others. However, Summit Music Festival was extremely helpful in my development as a teacher. The cello professor there was very generous with his philosophies about pedagogy. He discussed technique and performance through analysis of not only scores and history, but of the body as well. I was able to immediately apply methods he taught to my own students and I was pleased to see good results.

DDoA:  Do you think music camps are necessary for the development of professional cellists/musicians?
JL: I think it’s very important and very rewarding. Participating in camps allows you to meet new musicians and colleagues. You also get exposed to new perspectives, ideas and methods that can be very beneficial. I found that after an academic year, attending a camp gives me a renewed sense of motivation. I also feel so privileged during the camp because my only responsibility during the camp is music. It’s really wonderful that for a brief period of time, my days are spent practicing, rehearsing and having fun! I don’t have to worry about homework or a job. Instead, I can just be submerged into music and fall even more in love with making music.

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SUMMIT MUSIC FESTIVAL
New York’s Summer Institute for Intensive Chamber Music and Instrumental Training
New York, USA
Image Source

DDoA: Please share 2 LESSONS you have learned from camp that you can apply to life in general.
JL: 1. Meditation and reflection is crucial to development and growth. I’ve found that taking time to truly think and reflect about what you’ve learn in a classroom and how it applies to your life helps you take steps to improve your life. I personally have found that by keeping a journal helps me meditate, reflect and retain any new lessons.
2. In addition to meditation and reflection, discussion with friends and colleagues about your passion feeds the soul. There was a time where I would be fascinated by what I learned in class, but I never shared my interests with others. However, when I attended camps, as well as when I became a music major, I found it easier to share my interests. One of my favorite things to do is discuss what I’ve learned with fellow musicians. I also love to hear what they have learned. I love to talk about music, music history, and education. Camps have taught me to engage more in meaningful conversations with people, which has led me to appreciate people and learn so much about life.

DDoA: What direction do you plan to take your music?
JL: I plan to earn my teaching credential in California and teach music in a public middle school. I hope that I can go back to my hometown, which is a low-income area, and inspire students set and reach goals for higher education.

DDoA: What piece of advice can you offer young learners to inspire them and help them persevere in their musical training?
JL: Take notes! Keep a notebook handy because teachers and directors always drop meaningful quotes and pieces of advice that you’ll want to remember forever. When you hear something that clicks and causes an “a-ha!” moment, write it down immediately.


MikkoPablo

Cellist MIKKO PABLO
Fullerton, California, USA

MIKKO PABLO

DDoA: How long have you been studying/playing cello?
MP: It has been about 7 years since I started playing cello at 15 years old. That’s relatively late for a string instrumentalist, but I was so certain that I would pursue music, dove right into it.

DDoA: How often do you practice? perform?
MP: On a good day, I can get about 3 hours of concentrated practice. If I am having a really good day, I can get maybe about 5. During the semester, I perform about 1-2 times a week. These performances include studio class performances, weddings, chamber music ensembles, , master classes, orchestra concerts, etc.

DDoA: Which university/program are you attending right now?
MP: I am currently finishing my undergraduate degree at the California State University at Fullerton.

DDoA: Are you currently a member of an orchestra/camerata?
MP: Outside of my school orchestra, I am currently not in any orchestra or camerata. I am planning to audition for a few this coming school year.

DDoA: How many times have you attended a summer music camp?
MP: I have attended a music festival 10 times.

DDoA: So far, which music camp has been the most memorable for you? Which one has been the most helpful to your development?
MP: These questions are a little bit more tricky to answer. I remember each festival for different reasons (the people, the location, the program). I would say, however, that I had the most fun at the Schlern Music Festival up in the Italian Alps. The view from every window was breath taking! I have to say that every festival I have attended has enhanced my cello playing in one way or another. Attending the Roundtop music festival, for instance, really helped me grow as an orchestral musician.

DDoA: Do you think  music camps are necessary for the development of professional cellists/musicians?
MP: Yes, I am a firm believer of summer music  camps/festivals as being an integral part of every musician’s education and training. I think of them as summer semesters for us classical music students. I especially advocate summer festivals in Europe, since majority of the music we play has its roots in Western European cultures. When one is immersed in the context, or, at least, a modern approximation of the context of a musical composition, that piece of music really begins to take a deeper meaning.

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Schlern International Music Festival
Völs am Schlern, South Tyrol, Italy
 “Get inspired and energized by the unique Alpine landscape; combine intense music experience and recreation in the heart of the Nature Park Schlern-Rosengarten.”
via Schlern’s website

DDoA: Please share 2 LESSONS you have learned from camp that you can apply to life in general.
MP:  Oftentimes at music festivals, participants are expected to make high quality music with people they have just met. This teaches festival musicians the valuable skill of flexibility with each other. In order to make cohesive and unified music with a chamber group, one must be able to adapt to the others and be willing to make compromises. This skill has definitely helped me in my own personal life. Participating in music festivals has also reminded me that learning never ends. At the festivals I participate in, I meet so many amazing teachers and performers who still practice hours everyday because they are still learning so much. Their example gives us young musicians a valuable lesson in humility and an understanding of the bigger picture. It also instills in us the excitement of living life to learn new things!

DDoA: What direction do you plan to take your music?
MP: I definitely want to be able to have a career in performing music. Whether that will be with an orchestra or in a fusion band or in a recording studio only time will tell! I am open to all the possibilities as long as I can be making high level music!

DDoA: What piece of advice can you offer young learners to inspire them and help them persevere in their musical training?
MP: Have fun and never forget the reason why you started playing. Remember that you can learn something from anyone you meet or play music with. Jam, often. And lastly, learn about where the music you love comes from so you can learn where you can take it!


 CECILIA ORAZI DDoA: How long have you been studying/playing cello? CO: Since I was eight (15 years)

Solo Recital

Cellist CECILIA ORAZI at her solo recital
Pittsburgh, PA, USA

DDoA:  How often do you practice? perform?
CO: practice? Every day for an average of 3 hours
CO: perform? At least once a month, orchestra or chamber performances

DDoA:  Which university/program are you attending right now?
CO: Carnegie Mellon University School of Music, Master of Music degree, Pittsburgh PA

DDoA:  Are you currently a member of an orchestra/camerata?
CO: CMU Philharmonic and a string quartet

DDoA:  How many times have you attended a summer music camp?
CO: ENCORE School for Strings, Interlochen Arts Camp, Credo Chamber Music Camp (twice), Chautauqua Festival, Round Top Music Festival (twice)

DDoA:  So far, which music camp has been the most memorable for you? Which one has been the most helpful to your development?
CO: There have been memorable parts of each festival in terms of performances/conductors/repertoire. Playing principal on Strauss’ Also Sprach Zarathustra on the final concert at Round Top this summer (2014) was definitely a highlight of my career as a cellist thus far. My favorite part about going to festivals is meeting people from all over the country and the world and the lasting connections that are made.

DDoA: Which one has been the most helpful to your development?
CO: Round Top in terms of repertoire learned and performed under a different conductor each week.

DDoA:  Do you think music camps are necessary for the development of professional cellists/musicians?
CO: Absolutely, especially when there are opportunities to perform with or learn from world class musicians.

DDoA:  Please share 2 LESSONS you have learned from camp that you can apply to life in general.
CO: Be aware of your body and posture to prevent injury. Perform to your highest standard for the most rewarding experience.

DDoA:  What direction do you plan to take your music?
CO: Orchestral performance and teaching (Suzuki method/young kids)

DDoA:  What piece of advice can you offer young learners to inspire them and help them persevere in their musical training?
CO: You’re never done learning. Never be afraid to think outside of the box in terms of career options.

Orchestra Performance at Round Top

Roundtop Music Festival Orchestra Performance
Roundtop, Texas, USA, Summer 2014


JENNIFER PITTMAN DDoA: How long have you been studying/playing cello?
JP: 14 years

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Cellist JENNIFER PITTMAN
Florida, USA

DDoA: How often do you practice? perform?
JP: Practice- 2.5 hrs a day, Perform- solo once a month on average; with chamber and orchestra groups 2-3 times a week

DDoA: Which university/program are you attending right now?
JP: Florida state university, master of music in cello performance

DDoA: Are you currently a member of an orchestra/camerata?
JP:  I’m in the Florida state university orchestra and I sub with the Albany symphony orchestra in Georgia, the Tallahassee symphony orchestra, and other orchestras around the Florida and Georgia area

DDoA: How many times have you attended a summer music camp? JP: 11 times

DDoA: So far, which music camp has been the most memorable for you? Which one has been the most helpful to your development?
JP: Round top festival institute, met fantastic people, played great music, had great teachers

DDoA: Do you think music camps are necessary for the development of professional cellists/musicians?
JP: Yes, the solo, orchestral, and chamber music experience provided at summer festivals is essential for the developing musician

DDoA: Please share 2 LESSONS you have learned from camp that you can apply to life in general.
JP: Learning how to work with people very closely on details of musical works and performance very readily translates to other circumstances requiring close collaboration. Summer festivals have given me a unique opportunity to work with people from all of America and all over the world.

DDoA: What direction do you plan to take your music?
JP: University teaching position

DDoA: What piece of advice can you offer young learners to inspire them and help them persevere in their musical training? JP: Realize that with every minute of focused practice your playing will improve, and that with the right practice technique, progress will be substantially visible from day to day. And often,  the times of struggle and apparent lack of progress are the most important opprotunities for creative solutions and musical growth. Masterclass with Emilio Colón

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Masterclasses with Emilio Colón (from left to right) – cellist #2 – Cecilia Orazi,
cellist #4 – Jennifer Pittman and cellist #8- Mikko Pablo.
Roundtop Music Festival, Summer 2014, Roundtop, Texas, USA

Take a virtual tour of the Roundtop Music Festival Concert Hall Check out this selective List of The 20 Most Beautiful Summer Camp Music Festivals Around The World by CMUSE * I’ve learned that some music camps/festivals accept all levels while others are more selective, requiring an audition (audition repertoire requirements vary from camp to camp) and admitting only students of a certain level. These festivals are usually run by grants and donations. Please ask your music teacher/mentor for advice as to the music camp/festival suitable for your level and development goals.


image for header So do… join a music festival and meet and learn with other wonderful talents. The positive experience there will be good for your music and spirit.

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This entry was posted on September 4, 2014 by in Collaborate, Connect and tagged , .
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