DAILY DOSE OF ART

As prescribed by Paulina Constancia

IKEA Meatballs & A World of Possibilities

Hello and welcome to another Food Day at Daily Dose of Art! After a whole week’s posts on Scandinavia’s MIDSUMMER, I bring you a culinary mainstay in that region —meatballs! We look specifically into a frozen product from IKEA (Sweden’s gift to the world)and its many possibilities.
IKEA’s köttbullar (meatballs)
Available frozen at IKEA’s Swedish Food Market 

Check out the curious anatomy of the IKEA Meatball

A Little About Swedish Meatballs:
Due to Sweden’s large north-south expanse there have always been regional differences in Swedish cuisine. Historically, in the far North, meats such as reindeer, and other (semi-) game dishes were eaten, some of which have their roots in the Sami culture, while fresh vegetables have played a larger role in the South. Many traditional dishes employ simple, contrasting flavours, such as the traditional dish of meatballs and gravy with tart, pungent lingonberry jam (slightly similar in taste to cranberry sauce).
(Info from Wikipedia)

Let’s hear it from the Swedes…
(from the official gateway to Sweden)
Köttbullar or Swedish meatballs must be prepared, above all, with love. This is why “Mom’s meatballs” are a widespread concept in Sweden, and there are many different favorite recipes. Some people feel there should be grated onion in the meatball mixture itself, while others prefer to dice the onion and fry it separately. Some people feel that their meatballs should be served with thick brown gravy, while others prefer it with a thin meat juice. As part of a smörgåsbord buffet, it is better to skip the gravy altogether.


In southern Sweden many people prefer their ground meat with a little more fat, but the further north you go, the less pork you will find in the meatball mixture. However, bread or rusk crumbs allowed to swell in milk are as important as the lingonberries on the side. They give Swedish meatballs their special soft consistency. 

IKEA’s köttbullar (meatballs)
One fan  from Portland, Oregon confesses, “There is something about an IKEA meatball. They are perfect bites of savory goodness. They are equally bready and meaty, and they are ever-so-slightly perfumed with nutmeg.” (Source)

Here’s how they are served at the IKEA Restaurant
15 meatballs served with mashed potatoes, 
cream sauce and lingonberries
all for $3.99 (in the USA) 
IKEA Photo

IKEA’s Frozen Meatballs 
have unlimited possibilities, 
think of it as a base 
for many culinary adventures.
Here are a few ways 
you can experiment with them:
1. Meatballs: fried and served
If you feel patriotic, plant a flag atop your mountain of meatballs. All flags will look good against this meaty brown background.hahaha…
Don’t forget to grab your favourite dipping sauce.
Image Source
2. Meatballs Stroganoff
Image Source
3. Meatballs PIZZA
Image Source
4. Meatballs SANDWICH
Image Source
Think of adding meatballs to your soups and stews.You can even use it to fill your tacos, tortillas or pita breads. This post could go on and on… but the challenge is for you to discover for yourself the world of possibilities that a bag of frozen meatballs has in store for you!!!!


102 recipes in Using Frozen Meatballs 

Try Out Some Dipping Sauces for your Meatballs
If you’re vegetarian (like myself), you can still have your meatballs and eat them too!
How about making some “Meaty” vegetarian balls? 
Try taking them to a Pot-Luck dinner and watch the suprised faces when the diners find out there’s no meat in them. Also great in spaghetti sauce or meatball Stroganoff. 

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This entry was posted on June 30, 2012 by in Uncategorized.
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