DAILY DOSE OF ART

As prescribed by Paulina Constancia

Día del Padre series (5) – Father, how much do you make an hour?

Father’s Day this year is June 17th. So this week, I bring you a special series called “Dia del Padre”

Today we look into a father’s role in raising his children. We will also read an inspiring story about a father and his son. May this serve as a reminder for all fathers to re-examine the motivation behind the very long hours at work and if it really is worth the gap that it creates between them and their growing children.
“Bonding with Blossoms”
Art on a Kitchen Cabinet Face
by Paulina Constancia
From the Floral Chorus Collection, 1996
A Father’s Role

A father’s role in the raising of his children has changed dramatically over the past century or two. In generations past, sons expected to follow in their fathers’ footsteps, apprenticing in their work and in their approach to life. During the nineteenth century, however, fathers began to go out to work, and the measure of a man’s success slowly changed. Rather than the closeness of his family and the strength of his family business, a man’s worth could be measured in his income, the value of his house, and the size of his car. Parenting became “women’s work”; fathers were just too busy earning a living. And generations of boys grew up hungering for closeness with a father they barely knew, someone who came home only to eat dinner, look over homework, hear about the day’s misbehavior, and watch a little television.
Check out the post, “Mandala Inspirations (1) – For Someone Gone But Not Forgotten” art and poetry dedicated to my Dad, the late German Lee, Jr. I miss you Daddy!


Here is today’s inspirational story….

Story Source
A father came home from work late, tired and irritated, to find his 5-year old son waiting for him at the door.

Son: “Father, may I ask you a question?”

Father replied: “Yeah sure, what is it?”

Son: “Father, how much do you make an hour?”

Father said angrily: “That’s none of your business. Why do you ask such a thing?”

Son: “I just want to know. Please tell me, how much do you make an hour?”

Father: “If you must know, I make $20 an hour.”

”Oh,” the little boy replied, with his head down. Looking up, he said, “Father, may I please borrow $10? “

The father was furious, “If the only reason you asked that is so you can borrow some money to buy a silly toy or some other nonsense, then you march yourself straight to your room and go to bed. Think about why you are being so selfish. I work hard everyday for such childish behaviour.” 




The little boy quietly went to his room and shut the door. Father sat down and started to get even angrier about the little boy’s questions. How dare he ask such questions only to get some money? After about an hour or so, the father had calmed down, and started to think: Maybe there was something he really needed to buy with that $10 and he really didn’t ask for money very often.

The father went to the door of the little boy’s room and opened the door.

”Are you asleep, son?” Father asked.

”No Father, I am awake,” replied the little boy.

”I have been thinking, maybe I was too hard on you earlier,” said the father. “It’s been a long day and I took out my aggravation on you. Here’s the $10 you asked for.”

The little boy sat straight up, smiling. “Oh, thank you Father!” He yelled.

Then, reaching under his pillow he pulled out some crumpled up bills.

The father, seeing that the little boy already had money, started to get angry again.

The little boy slowly counted out his money, and then looked up at his father.

”Why do you want more money if you already have some?” the father grumbled.

”Because I didn’t have enough, but now I do,” the little boy replied.

”Father, I have $20 now. Can I buy an hour of your time? Please come home early tomorrow. I would like to have dinner with you.”

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This entry was posted on June 14, 2012 by in Uncategorized.
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