DAILY DOSE OF ART

As prescribed by Paulina Constancia

Fans, Mirrors & Spoons

Whoever said chocolates and roses were the only ways to say I love you? Fans, Mirrors & Spoons ( & apples too!) –here are some means of expressing love in some parts of the world. 
“Fans, Mirrors & Spoons” 
(& apples too!)
Curious Courtship 
from Around the World
a digital collage by Paulina Constancia

Victorian Women and Their Fans

In Victorian times, men were well aware that women were not just fanning to cool themselves, here are some of the things they could say with specific fan movements:

The fan placed near the heart: You have won my love.

Half-opened fan pressed to the lips: You may kiss me.

Hiding the eyes behind an open fan: I love you.

Opening and closing the fan several times: You are cruel.

Fanning slowly: I am married.

Fanning quickly: I am engaged.

Twirling the fan in the left hand: You are being watched.

(Learn more about fans and Victorian courtship)

Isla Taquile’s Courting Mirror
I remember how this was one of the most curious customs shared to us by our tour guide when we visited Isla Taquile, Lago de Titicaca, Peru. 


“The typical age to get married is 16 for girls and 18 for boys and in the courting ritual, if a boy is single he will wear a hat of red and white that he has knitted himself and it must be of the absolute very best quality (on the island knitting is strictly a man´s job, women do the spinning). He will also keep a small mirror in his belt. The single girls will also keep a mirror in their pocket and wear a black shawl with four big multicoloured pompoms on the end each with a rock in the middle to make them heavy. If a boy sees a girl he likes he can reflect the sunlight in his mirror at her to get her attention, and if she likes him she may do the same. If she doesn´t however she may dip her hat or even hit him away with her pompoms! Sometimes the boy might even throw small stones at the girl (!) to get her attention. Then, if she likes him, she will take his hat from him and take it home to inspect the quality! She does this by filling it up with water – if no water leaks through she will know that the hat is of the finest quality and the boy is a good catch, however if the hat leaks then she will know that the boy is lazy. The guide told us that some boys have begun cheating now and have been rubbing animal fat inside the hat to stop the leaks!”
(Read more on “Sailing Lake Titicaca” by Anjuli Cooper)


The Welsh Love Spoon

“When Welsh couples talk about “spooning,” they’re not discussing cuddling. Since at least the 17th century, the Welsh have exchanged “lovespoons,” intricately hand-carved wooden spoons, as signs of romantic intentions. Young men spent hours meticulously crafting their spoons so they could offer their crushes the most magnificent utensil imaginable. If the gal accepted the spoon, the courtship was on. The courtship aspect of the spoons has since faded, but lovespoons are still given on special occasions as tokens of admiration and affection.”
(Read the full text here)
The Austrian Scented Apples
“In rural Austria, it’s not chocolate bon-bons that are the way to a lover’s heart; it’s apples soaked in armpit sweat. Young women do a ritual dance with apple slices lodged in their armpits. After the dance, each gives her slice to the man of her choice, and he then eats it.”
Source: 5 Strange Courting Rituals


So next time you want to buy chocolates or roses for your beloved, think again..you can be more creative than that!!! Hahahaha

One comment on “Fans, Mirrors & Spoons

  1. Mikko
    February 19, 2012

    Very interesting!

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This entry was posted on February 16, 2012 by in Communicate, Connect, Teach.
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